By: Condor Ferries and Jersey Tourism on 11/06/2013

Cycle Jersey

The Western and Eastern Leisure Routes are both around 40 kilometres long, and they have a mix of coastal  and inland cycling.

It is possible to start on the Family Route and then join the Western Route at La Corbiere if you wish to cycle further. Similarly one can do the Western Leisure Route and then join the Eastern Leisure Route near St.John’s Church. If one does this, you’ll enjoy a 62 kilometre ride around nearly the whole coastline. Every route has turn by turn instructions and a number of points of interest are described in detail.

Good Cycling Code
• Allow plenty of room for pedestrians
• Ring your bell when approaching walkers and other cyclists
• Slow down at bends and junctions
• Stop at yellow lines
• Wear something bright
• Make sure that your bike is in good working order
• Lock your bike when you leave it

Don’t forget that English bikes have the front brake on the right hand side. In Jersey they drive on the left! Also it is recommended to wear a cycle helmet.

Family Route: St.Helier to La Corbiere and back 24.2 Kilometres Elevation 70 metres No Hills Easy About 2 – 3 Hours
Passing: The Freedom Tree Sculpture / The Coronation Park and Playground / The Glass Church / St.Aubin’s Village / The Elephant Park Playground / Les Quennevais Sports Centre and Swimming Pool

Nearly all this route is on a dedicated cycle track that is shared with pedestrians. From St.Helier to St.Aubin the surface is tarmac and entirely level, after St.Aubin the route becomes hard-packed gravel and goes up an extremely gentle incline which is practically unnoticeable.  From St.Aubin to La Corbiere, there are a number of road crossings – please be careful when crossing these!

Family Route Turn by Turn Directions:
Leave Liberation Square, go towards the Harbour. Cross both roads - CARE
Turn right on Route 1 going towards West Park - St.Aubin – Corbiere Total 80m
Turn left on Route 1 Tourist Route between the railings and the old sea wall Total 255m
Turn right between the apartments Total 355m
Straight on over the two pedestrian crossings
Straight ahead – cross the roadway – CARE
At the Freedom Tree sculpture turn right Total 780m
Just after La Fregate Cafe turn left onto the Cycle Track which is marked by two white lines Total 1.1km
Continue on Route 1 passing The First Tower and The Old Station Cafe
Cycle parking for The Coronation Park – The Glass Church / playground / toilets / cafe Total 3.3km
Continue on Route 1 passing The Gunsite Cafe and La Haule Manor
Beside St.Brelade’s Parish Hall turn right to pass between the Harbour and the parish hall Total 5.9km
ST.AUBIN’S VILLAGE - cycle parking / toilets / cafes / pubs / restaurants
Cycle on, cross the road – CARE, cycle on the pavement past the National Westminister Bank
Cross another narrow road – CARE, into a tarmac slope between two buildings
This is the Start of the Railway Track still on Route 1 towards Les Quennevais - Corbiere Total 6.0km
Proceed with caution as this gravel track is shared with pedestrians
Also there are a number of road crossings in the next few kilometres
The Elephant Park - cycle parking / playground / toilets / cafe Total 8.3km
Continue on passing Les Quennevais Sports Centre and Swimming Pool
Please be aware that there are a few more road crossings ahead
When you reach the End of the Railway Track turn right onto the main road Total 11.9km
Freewheel towards the lighthouse and at the corner turn left Total 12.0km
LA CORBIERE - cycle parking / toilets / pub / ice cream kiosk
The Clasped Hands Memorial Total 12.1km
To return to St.Helier simply retrace your route

DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this brochure, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given. All distances and times given are approximate.

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What to see:
The Freedom Tree
This bronze by Richard Perry was unveiled by HRH Queen Elizabeth on Liberation Day, 9th May, 2005, the 60th anniversary of the Liberation of the island from German forces during the Second World War.  Perry chose an oak tree, because it symbolized strength, fortitude and new growth, things which are equally important today as they were during the Occupation.


In conjunction with the sculpture, 60 real oak trees were planted on three sites around the island. The poetry at the base of the tree, which was written at the request of Richard Perry, is by local poet, Linda Rose Parkes.

The Freedom Tree is three metres wide, and over six metres high. More than three and a half tonnes of bronze were used in its construction. Commissioned by the Jersey Public Sculpture Trust, it was cast at the Morris Singer Foundry at Basingstoke.

The Glass Church
The church that exists today is a refurbishment initiated by Florence Boot - Lady Trent, in memory of her husband who died in 1931. The church was a collaboration between Frenchman Rene Lalique and English architect Arthur Grayson.

Lalique had turned his hand from jewellery to moulded glass at the end of the 19th century.  Lalique created the irreplaceable moulded glass within the church. He made different textures in the glass by using sand blasting, acid etching and opaque glass. He also liked to illuminate the glass by having lighting within or behind it. He also liked to use leather, as the matt finish and the texture brought out the lustre of the glass.  Since the wartime damage to La Chapelle de la Viriege at Calvados in Normandy, it is likely that this church is the only church in the world to be wholly the work of Rene Lalique.

The Clasped Hands Memorial
The Clasped Hands memorial that stands beside the road to the lighthouse proves that seafaring disasters are not always a thing of the past. The sculpture was created by Derek Tristram from a perfect piece of granite that had previously been in the Harbour wall, and was unveiled on April 17th 1997 by former Senator Tony Chinn.

It records the St.Malo disaster, in 17thApril 1995, when a Channiland catamaran, the St.Malo, en route for Guernsey and Sark, struck La Frouquie rock, 900 metres north of La Corbiere. Due to the ship’s position, and the fact it was an Easter Bank Holiday, the rescue services arrived very quickly and all 307 passengers and crew were rescued safely.

West Coast Leisure Route
A circular route that takes in most of the western half of the island
43.5 Kilometres Elevation 110 metres 3 Hills Medium About 3 – 5 Hours
Passing: St.Aubin’s Village / Quennevias Sports Centre / La Corbiere / Greve de Lecq / The Devil’s Hole / St.John’s Church / La Hougue Boete / Morel Farm / Jersey War Tunnels / The Battle of Flowers HQ
The section from St.Helier to La Corbiere is on a dedicated cycle track that is shared with pedestrians. On this route the surface varies between tarmac, gravel and a sandy path. There are three steep climbs in the second half of our trip, but it’s mandatory to walk up one of these. After St.John’s Village the route is mainly downhill to St.Aubin’s Bay.
From St.Aubin to La Corbiere, there are a number of road crossings – please be careful when crossing these!

West Coast Leisure Route: Turn by Turn Directions
Leave Liberation Square, go towards the Harbour. Cross both roads - CARE
Turn right on Route 1 going towards West Park - St.Aubin – Corbiere Total 80m
Turn left on Route 1 Tourist Route between the railings and the old sea wall Total 255m
Turn right between the apartments Total 355m
Straight on over the two pedestrian crossings
Straight ahead – cross the roadway – CARE
At the Freedom Tree sculpture turn right Total 780m
Just after La Fregate Cafe turn left onto the Cycle Track which is marked by two white lines Total 1.1km
Continue on Route 1 passing The First Tower and The Old Station Cafe
Cycle parking for The Coronation Park – The Glass Church / toilets / cafe Total 3.3km
Continue on Route 1 passing The Gunsite Cafe and La Haule Manor
Beside St.Brelade’s Parish Hall turn right to pass between the Harbour and the Parish Hall Total 5.9km
ST. AUBIN’S VILLAGE - cycle parking / toilets / cafes / pubs / restaurants / shops
Cycle on, cross the road – CARE, cycle on the pavement past the National Westminister Bank
Cross another narrow road – CARE, into a tarmac slope between two buildings
This is the Start of the Railway Track still on Route 1 towards Les Quennevais - Corbiere Total 6.0km
Proceed with caution as this gravel track is shared with pedestrians
Also there are a number of road crossings in the next few kilometres
The Elephant Park - cycle parking / toilets / cafe Total 8.3km
Continue on passing Les Quennevais Sports Centre
Please be aware that there are a few more road crossings ahead
When you reach the End of the Railway Track turn right onto the main road Total 11.9km
LA CORBIERE - cycle parking / toilets / pub / ice cream kiosk
Freewheel down the hill and continue on around the corner
Turn left towards the beach following Route 1 to Petit Port Total 12.7km
Then dismount, turn right and walk on a rough track around the headland
On reaching the road, remount, and turn left on Route 1 to L’Etacq Total 13.6km
Continue on passing The La Pulente Pub, Le Braye Cafe and El Tico Cantina
Following Route 1 turn right into a Green Lane: la Route de la Marette Total 16.1km
At the crossroads, staying on Route 1, turn left towards L’Etacq Total 17.1km
Cycle straight on, following signs to Greve de Lecq - St.John’s Village Total 18.2km
At the crossroads go straight over into Rue des Pres
Then second right towards Greve de Lecq - Devil’s Hole - St.John’s Village
At the yellow line, turn left, then immediately hairpin right. Total 20.3km
When the lane forks, bear right into Mont Vibert
Climb the hill and follow the lane to the crossroads
Following Route 1, turn left. Total 21.7km
At the main road, turn right then immediately left. Total 21.9km
Bear right at the fork and go straight over the next tiny crossroads
On reaching the main road turn right then, after a few metres, turn left Total 22.7km
We descend gradually as we follow the Route 1 signs to the yellow line
At the yellow line turn left and freewheel down to the bay Total 23.5km
At the bottom of the hill follow the signs for Devil’s Hole - St.John’s Village Total 24.2km
GREVE DE LECQ - cycle parking / toilets / pubs / cafes
Cycle on for a few metres, then turn hairpin left after the Millennium Cross to climb the hill
At the sign, dismount and walk up the hill
At the top get back on your bicycle
Continue on Route 1, taking the next left into la Rue des Touettes Total 25.8km
Pass La Mare Wine Estate and The Priory Inn (The Devil’s Hole)
Drop into the valley. Turn left at the crossroads and climb the hill. Total 28.7km
Bear left at the top of the hill and take the next right into la Rue de Grand Mourier
Turn right at the junction, then bear left when the lane forks.
Stay on the Green Lane until it ends at the yellow line. Turn left here.
At the crossroads turn right onto Route 4 going towards Carrefour Selous - St.Aubin’s Bay Total 31.2km
ST.JOHN’S VILLAGE - cycle parking / pub / cafes / shops
Cycle up to the yellow line – CARE - turn left and then first right onto Route 4
Pass St.John’s Primary School and La Hougue Boete
Turn right at the end of this lane. Total 32.3km
Pass St.John’s Manor and take the next left into la Rue du Douet
Cycle on; going from St.Mary into St.Lawrence on Route 4
At the junction turn left towards Le Carrefour Selous Total 34.4km
Then immediately right into la Rue Sara Henry
At the end of this lane, at the crossroads with the main road, turn sharp right Total 34.6km
Take the first left to St.Aubin’s Bay
Follow the road around to the right and at the yellow line turn left
Carry on down Route 4 going through a tiny crossroads
Continue on through the next crossroads beside Morel Farm Total 36.0km
Take the next right and descend the hill
At the end of the Green Lane Les Charrieres Malorey turn left Total 37.2km
Descend the slope and follow the road to the right
Pass The Battle of Flowers Association Headquarters
At the junction with the main road – CARE – turn right towards St.Aubin’s Bay
Soon after turn left into la Rue du Moulin de Tesson
At the yellow line turn left
Then immediately right along the track towards St.Aubin’s Bay Total 38.2km
Use the pedestrian crossing to cross the road – CARE
On reaching the beachside Cycle Track turn left onto Route 1 Total 38.9km
To return to St.Helier simply retrace your route on Route 1 going east
DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this brochure, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given.
All distances and times given are approximate.

What to see:
St.Aubin’s Village
Like many other coastal villages, St.Aubin takes its name from the 6thCentury bishop of Angers, who was said to give protection from pirates. This is rather ironic, as Jersey’s highly successful fleet of privateers was based here during the English Civil War.
Before the harbour at St.Helier was built, St.Aubin was the main port for Jersey. It lay sheltered from the south-west gales behind Noirmont Point and the firm sands allowed boats to unload their cargo directly into carts drawn up alongside. The port prospered and the wealthy merchants put up elegant houses on the quayside to be on hand when their ships returned. The long narrow gardens of these houses show how much land has been reclaimed from the sea. In those days there was no road around the bay from St.Helier, everything was carried across the beach by horse and cart. In fact the island’s first bus service was a horse and cart that ran across the sands from St.Helier to St.Aubin.

La Corbiere Lighthouse
This lighthouse, which stands at Jersey’s most south westerly point, has the distinction of being the first reinforced concrete lighthouse built in the British Isles. The light came into service in 1874. It was designed by the marine architect Sir John Coode and built by engineer Imrie Bell.
Originally powered by paraffin, it switched to electricity in 1965. The current strength of the beam is 1000 watts, which creates a beam that is visible for 18 miles in good conditions from the 62 feet tall lighthouse. In foggy conditions, a bell was rung but this was replaced in 1933 by a fog horn operated by compressed air.
Since 1976, there has been no lighthouse keeper, as both the light and the fog horn now run automatically. Before then, a team of four lighthouse keepers, working in pairs, manned the site. Each pair would spend 48 hours in the lighthouse, with one man doing a 6 hour shift. If conditions were extremely bad, both would be on duty.

St.John’s Church
In common with St.Mary’s Church and Trinity Church, St,John’s Church has also had a pillar removed. This happened because the congregation, particularly those who sat in the south aisle, complained that they could not see the pulpit due to the huge pillar that stood in the way.
The first attempt to get the pillar removed was in 1828, when the Assembly told the rector to seek permission from the Ecclesiastical Court. Fearing that the roof would collapse, the rector never asked. Three years later, the congregation appealed to the Ecclesiastical Court; but they were refused.
When a new rector arrived at St.John’s Church, another attempt was made to remove the pillar, but he too felt it unwise. It was only when the rector went on his holidays to France that the congregation got their way. On his return home, he found the pillar in his garden and a broad arch inside the church.

La Hougue Boete
This mound of earth is all that is left of an early Neolithic burial site, and is probably the only closed chamber grave in Jersey. It was excavated in 1911 by Mauger and Raworth who found a rectangular dry stone chamber. Before La Societe Jersiaise had a chance to inspect it, the tunnel that had been made earlier collapsed. The report that was issued by the excavation team said that they found a rectangular chamber, with human bones and pottery inside. Allegedly they found a horse’s skeleton with a man’s skeleton resting on the horse’s neck, a piece of greenstone axe, a flint implement and some pottery.
A recent examination of the horse’s teeth shows that the horse was not around 6,000 years ago, and the pottery that is supposed to be from this site is actually Iron Age or later. All this has thrown the early description of the burial site into doubt, and most of the finds from the 1911 excavation have now disappeared.

The Jersey War Tunnels
The original plan for the complex was to excavate four parallel tunnels, each about 100 metres long into the hillside. These would be connected by seven shorter tunnels, running at right angles. By the end of the war, only two of the long tunnels had been made together with six of the shorter tunnels. In the course of construction, 14,000 tons of rock was excavated and around 4,000 tons of concrete poured in.
The tunnels were initially made as a munitions barracks, the 35 metres of shale above the tunnels guaranteeing the safety of anything beneath it. In 1943, with the likelihood of an imminent Allied invasion of France, the tunnels were converted into a casualty receiving station to handle injured troops from France and even Jersey if need be. At the end of the war, these tunnels contained 600 beds, an operating theatre, a dispensary, telephone exchange, storerooms and kitchens.
East Coast Leisure Route:
A circular route that takes in most of the eastern half of the island

43.5 Kilometres Elevation 130 metres 4 Hills Medium About 3 – 5 Hours
Passing: The First Tower / Millbrook Reservoir / Hamptonne Country Life Museum / St.John’s Parish Hall / Rozel / St.Catherine’s Breakwater / Mont Orgueil Castle / Gorey / The Bathing Pool / The Steam Clock

Here is a trip around the east of the island. It starts going west towards St.Aubin, but soon heads inland through a beautiful valley towards the North Coast. The route to the North Coast is not hilly, however some of the bays that this route drops into are nearly at sea level, so expect some steep climbs. The last few kilometres are quite flat.

East Coast Leisure Route: Turn by Turn Directions
Leave Liberation Square, go towards the Harbour. Cross both roads - CARE
Turn right on Route 1 going towards West Park - St.Aubin – Corbiere Total 80m
Turn left on Route 1 Tourist Route between the railings and the old sea wall Total 255m
Turn right between the apartments Total 355m
Straight on over the two pedestrian crossings
Straight ahead – cross the roadway – CARE
At the Freedom Tree sculpture turn right Total 780m
Just after La Fregate Cafe turn left onto the Cycle Track which is marked by two white lines Total 1.1km
Continue on Route 1 passing The First Tower
At The Old Station Cafe turn right onto Route 2 going towards Hamptonne – Victoria Village Total 3.0km
Dismount and walk – CARE
Cross the road using the pedestrian crossing, turn left, and walk up the pavement on the right
Follow the pavement around to the right to pass the supermarket
Cross the road using the pedestrian crossing and turn right.
At the next junction turn left and remount your bicycle Total 3.5km
Cycle on passing Millbrook Reservoir, The St.Lawrence Millennium Stone and Dannemarche Reservoir
End of Route 2 continue ahead onto Route 3 going towards St.Ouen’s Bay – Hamptonne Total 6.5km
Climb passing Hamptonne Country Life Museum
At the yellow line, turn left and, shortly afterwards, right following Route 3 Total 7.5km
On reaching the main road, turn right - CARE
Take the next left into la Ruelle
Turn right at the yellow line and follow the lane into le Mont Sorsoleil
The lane dips and rises through a tiny crossroads
At the next crossroads turn right onto Route 4 to St.John’s Village Total 8.5km
Take the next right into a Green Lane
When we meet the main road, cross straight over into la Ruette – CARE
At the end of this lane, turn right, then left into la Rue du Douet de Rue
Cycle on from St Lawrence into St.Mary on Route 4
Turn right at the next crossroads Total 10.7km
Carry on into St.John from St.Mary on Route 4
Take the second left into a Green Lane: la Rue des Buttes Total 11.5km
Pass St.John’s Primary School
At the crossroads, next to St.John’s Parish Hall, go straight over Total 12.4km
Then bear right and cycle on to the yellow line
End of Route 4 turn right onto Route 1 to Rozel Total 12.6km
Go straight over the crossroads – CARE
Then straight ahead onto the gravel track: Mont Mado Lane
At the end of the track, go straight on – CARE
Stay on Route 1 for some distance
Near the radar station turn right into la Rue de la Petite Lande Total 14.8km
Go over the tiny crossroads into la Rue du Nord
At the next T junction turn right
Take a right when we meet the main road at the end of la Rue de Cambrai Total 16.3km
Turn left, the lane dives and climbs again
At the next yellow line turn left Total 16.7km
Follow the road around to the right – CARE
Climb slightly then turn left
Stay on Route 1 for some distance
At the T junction turn left towards Rozel – St.Catherines Total 18.3km
Stay on Route 1 for some distance
Descend the long hill into Rozel
ROZEL - toilets / cafes / pub / restaurants
Follow the road around to the right at the bottom
Take the first right to pass The Rozel Bay public house Total 20.5km
Proceed on and walk up a very steep hill
At the top turn left
Turn right at the end of Rue de Caen
Then shortly afterwards turn left Total 21.9km
Continue on, and go straight on at the crossroads
Descend the narrow lane into Fliquet Bay
Climb out and at the yellow line at the top turn left following Route 1
Descend again to a crossroads where we turn left to St.Catherines Total 25.4km
Cycle to St.Catherine’s Breakwater and then return back to this crossroads
Go through the crossroads and climb the hill le Mont de la Mare St.Catherine
Turn hairpin right into the Green Lane: Rue des Charrieres Total 28.0km
Climb this hill and continue on
At the end of Rue de la Forge turn left
At the crossroads go straight ahead into la Longue Rue – CARE
Take the first left following Route 1 to Gorey Village Total 29.6km
Turn left at the next junction
Turn right at the yellow line
Continue on Route 1 to Gorey
At the next yellow line turn right Total 31.2km
And right again at the next junction, then immediately left
Go straight across the crossroads into la Rue de la Pouclee et des Quatre Chemins - CARE
At the end of the road, go straight on following Route 1 – CARE
Dismount and walk down this very steep hill
At the bottom of the hill, turn hairpin right and descend further Total 32.8km
At the yellow line turn left
GOREY - cycle parking / toilets / cafes / pubs / restaurants / shops
At the bottom of this hill, cycle towards the sea wall and the promenade
Once on the beachside promenade, turn right and cycle away from the harbour
This promenade is shared with walkers – CARE
Leave the promenade and using care cross over to the gravel cycle track on the far side of the road
Stay on the gravel track
Follow the track as it bends right, then cross over to the track on the far side.
Turn right towards the Village
Then take the first left
At the T junction turn left Total 34.8km
Stay on this lane until the yellow line where we bear left into Le Catillon
Stay on Route 1 for some distance
Then at the next yellow line cross diagonally into la Rue des Alleurs
Climb la Rue des Alleurs
At the top cycle on following Route 1 to the Town Centre
At the junction turn left into Rue au Blancq towards the Town Centre Total 37.4km
Carry on along this lane, then turn first right into Les Huriaux
At the tiny crossroads turn left following Route 1
Freewheel down the hill
At the bottom of la Rue Soulas, turn left Total 38.9km
Cycle into the Green Lanes of St.Clement
Turn right at the T junction at the end of Rue du Coin Total 39.3km
We come to the End of Route 1 beside the tennis courts Total 40.4km
To return to Liberation Square via the Coast Road
Turn left at this junction with the main road – Care
At the traffic lights turn right
At the next yellow line turn right towards St.Helier
Follow the road around to the left
Opposite the Bathing Pool get on the pavement and continue along the promenade – CARE Total 41.4km
The cycle track emerges onto a broad pavement
Stay on it until prompted to cross to the other side of the road
Another dedicated cycle track can be found there
Beware when it ends after the low brick building Total 42.7km
Continue on the main road for a short while
Then return to the cycle track after the second small harbour
The track runs between the railings on the seaside of the road
Pass the Steam Clock and using the pedestrian crossing return to Liberation Square Total 43.4km

DISCLAIMER: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this brochure, no liability can be accepted by the author or the publishers for any loss, damage or injury caused by errors in, or omissions from, the information given. All distances and times given are approximate.


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What to see:
First Tower
The area called First Tower takes its name from the Jersey Round Tower that lies about 75 yards from the shore. At the time, it was customary to number towers from one end of a bay to the other. Only the Jersey Round Towers in St.Ouen’s Bay were located alphabetically.
These towers were proposed by the island’s Governor, Sir Henry Seymour Conway, as an effective means of defending the island, and they predate English Martello towers by about 15 years. It was planned to erect 30 around the coast line, and of the 23 that went up, we still have 17 standing. Unlike Martellos, that are designed primarily to mount a heavy gun, Jersey Round Towers are made for men with muskets, and they are normally built about 500 yards apart which is the distance that a musket ball travels.

Hamptonne
At Hamptonne, we find buildings from the 15th century right up to the 19th century.
The Langlois House, the smaller thatched building, follows the Breton style of farm building common in the mediaeval period. This had rooms on the first floor for the farmer and his family, while beneath them was space for the animals and storage. This building is restored to its 18th century state.
In the centre of the site stands the Hamptonne House. Laurens Hamptonne was granted Letters Patente that gave him similar rights to a Seigneur. This meant he could erect a colombier or pigeon loft on his property, and the property had a similar status to a manor. The Hamptonne House has been restored to resemble the building in the 1640s.
The most modern house is the Syvret building. This was built on the site of an earlier building in the 1830s. As well as accommodation, this housed an apple crusher and a rare twin-screw cider press.

Samuel Curtis
Chateau La Chaire is set within an extensive and historic garden that was created by Samuel Curtis, the well-known Victorian horticulturalist.
In the 1830s, Curtis started looking for somewhere to grow subtropical plants that until then had only been grown under glass. He scoured the British Isles without success, until he arrived in Jersey in 1841. Here at Rozel, he found a sunny, sheltered valley with a conglomerate soil and its own microclimate. He purchased La Chaire, and started to build a house and create a garden.
Although Curtis did not move here permanently until 1852, the gardens were still developed in his absence. Together with his daughter Harriet, he grew an unparalleled range of subtropical plants in what became known as The Tropical Garden of La Chaire. Samuel Curtis died on January 6th 1860, and he is buried in the churchyard of St.Martin's Parish Church.

Mont Orgueil Castle
The castle that we see today was started at the beginning of the 13th century, when King John lost his lands in nearby Normandy. Suddenly Jersey, only 14 miles away from France, was thrust into the frontline of a war zone. Of all the places in the Channel Islands to erect a formidable castle, here at Gorey, within sight of the French coast was a natural choice.
The advent of gunpowder heralded the castle’s demise; Mont St.Nicholas, the hill that faces the castle, provides the perfect place for attackers to array their artillery.
Brave attempts were made to defend Mont Orgueil; the Grand Battery- the huge outer wall that overlooks the green, and the Somerset Tower – the tallest part of the castle that dominates Mont St.Nicholas, were built specifically to mount cannon.
Despite all this, the castle was unable to keep pace with cannon technology and it was decided to build Elizabeth Castle in St.Aubin’s Bay.

The Bathing Pool
In 1865 a swimming club was formed with 31 members. At that time women swum at Havre des Pas, and men at La Collette.
By 1874 plans had been approved to build a permanent bathing facility, and a petition was sent to the States of Jersey asking for help with the project. By 1892, there were plans for two pools, one for women and one for men. In 1893, the Jersey Swimming Club was incorporated, and it applied to lease the shore at Havre des Pas. The following year, plans were submitted for a ladies’ bathing pool. The money to build it was raised, and in May, 1895, the new pool was opened.
At the end of 1899 the plans for the men’s pool at La Collette were shelved, but from 1900, men were able to use the women’s pool at Havre des Pas. By May 1904, mixed bathing had been allowed, but only between the hours of 9a.m. to 10.30a.m!

Bike Hire Companies:
Jersey Bike Repairs / Hire
Tel: +44 (0)7797 914452 Email: info@jerseybikerepairs.com Web: www.jerseybikerepairs.com

Jersey Funbike - Cycle Hire
Tel: +44 (0)1534 746780 Email: jerseycycletours@yahoo.co.uk Web: www.littletrain.co.uk

Puffin Bike Hire
Tel: +44 (0)7797 720 159 Email: info@jerseybikehire.co.uk Web: www.jerseybikehire.co.uk

Zebra Hire
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 736556 Email: enquiries@zebrahire.com Web: www.zebrahire.com


Bike Shops:
Aaron’s Bikes
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 280989 Email: info@jerseybikerepairs.com Web: www.jerseybikerepairs.com
Big Maggy’s
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 729900 Email: sales@bigmaggys.com Web: www.bigmaggys.com

Boudins Cycles
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 732221 Email: info@boudinscycles.com Web: www.boudinscycles.com

Lawrence de Gruchy
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 730090 Email: lawrencedegruchyltd@jerseymail.co.uk Fax: +44 (0) 1534 735756

Mark Pickford’s Cycle Shop
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 832280 Email: enquiries@markpickfordcycles.com Web: www.markpickfordcycles.com

Pedal Power
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 739385 Email: info@pedalpowerjsy.com Web: www.pedalpowerjsy.com

The Cycle Centre
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 876889 Email: thecyclecentrejsy@yahoo.co.uk Web: www.thecyclecentrejsy.co.uk


Cycle Tours:
Cycle in Jersey
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 853525 Email: enquiries@cycleinjersey.com Web: www.cycleinjersey.com

Jersey Adventures
Tel: +44 (0) 1534 873074 Email: john@jerseyadventures.com Web: www.jerseyadventures.com

Pure Adventure Ltd
Tel: + 44 (0) 1534 769165 Email: info@purejersey.com Web: www.purejersey.com

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